DRIVING DRUNK IN GEORGIA


DUI PENALTIES IN GEORGIA


DUI PENALTIES EXPLAINED


 

other serious offenses


Open Container Law

The law defines "open alcoholic beverage container" as any bottle, can, or other receptacle that contains any amount of alcoholic beverage and: (1) is open or has a broken seal; or (2) the contents of which are partially removed.

The law prohibits anyone from consuming any alcoholic beverage, or possessing any open alcoholic beverage container in the passenger area of any motor vehicle which is on the roadway or shoulder of any public highway. Only a person who consumes an alcoholic beverage or possesses an open alcoholic beverage container will be charged with an open container violation; however, a driver who is alone in a motor vehicle shall be deemed to be in possession of any open alcoholic beverage container. Anyone who violates this law is subject to a fine not to exceed $200.

This provision does not apply to any passenger in the passenger area of a motor vehicle designed, maintained, or used primarily for the transportation of persons for compensation or in the living quarters of a motor home or house trailer.

Aggressive Driving Law

A person commits the offense of aggressive driving when he/she operates any motor vehicle with the intent to annoy, harass, molest, intimidate, injure, or obstruct another person. Any person convicted of aggressive driving will be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature and a six point assessment toward the suspension of their drivers license.

Super Speeder Law

The Georgia Super Speeder Law, which took effect January 1, 2010, fines an additional $200 state fee to any driver convicted of traveling over 75 mph on a two-lane road, or traveling over 85 mph anywhere in the state. Failure to pay the fee will result in a license suspension and an additional $50 fee. These fees are tacked on to fines imposed by local jurisdictions for speeding violations.

Not only is the law intended to lower the amount of speeders and speed-related accidents, but fees collected under the law will go strait to Georgia’s trauma care hospital system, where over half of the patients are typically victims of motor vehicle accidents.